Author Archives: Melissa Male

New EJS Report: Breaking The Chains 2: The Preschool-To-Prison Pipeline Epidemic

The increasing trend of suspending students is part of a phenomenon known as the school-to-prison pipeline (“STPP”). Equal Justice Society’s previous publication, “Breaking The Chains”, explains the STPP as the process by which at-risk high school and middle school students are pushed out of learning environments and into the juvenile justice system. Our new report, […]
Read More »

Equal Justice Society’s 18th Anniversary (Virtual) Gala

Equal Justice Society’s 18th Anniversary (Virtual) Gala Thursday, October 11, 2018 INDIVIDUAL TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE! The Board of Directors of the Equal Justice Society invites you to attend our virtual gala this Thursday, October 11. We cordially invite you to relax comfortably in your pajamas on this evening and hope you delight in the fact […]
Read More »

ACTION ALERT: The American Bar Association is taking public opinion on Kavanaugh – please reach out if you are a member​!

Thanks to our friend Kelly Dermody for bringing the following information. Although the ABA initially gave its full support to Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination, after the testimony given by Dr. Blasey Ford last Thursday, ABA President Bob Carlson sent a letter to leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee urging the committee to conduct its […]
Read More »

Take Action Today to Stop Trump from Packing the Supreme Court!

During CCRC’s #StopKavanaugh community meeting earlier this month, our friends at Indivisible East Bay (IEB) gave a presentation on their impactful work to lobby Congress on numerous issues, from protecting the ACA to preventing the appointment of conservative judicial nominees to the federal bench. After their presentation, we were convinced that we wanted to remain […]
Read More »

Straws: A Disability Rights Issue

The effort to reduce single-use plastic materials in our daily habits is, without question, critical to the health of our planet.  In fact, those of us in marginalized communities – people of color and low-income individuals in particular – often benefit the most from reducing waste and exposure to toxins in our air and water, […]
Read More »