DREAM Act part II

A recent posting on the ImmigrationProf Blog highlights the debate about the military service provisions that are in the DREAM Act.

A father, whose son was a soldier died in Iraq, made this impassioned caution to those seeking passage of the DREAM Act, due to the military service option as a path to legalization:

It give me great joy to see students taking non-violent action to find a solution to the immigration question. Many of them came to the United States as children and have finished their high school education. Now, because they lack legal documents, they face an uncertain future that may deny them the opportunity to attend college or find a decent job. The DREAM Act offers them a light at the end of an otherwise dark and uncertain road.

I see students on fasts, in marches, lobbying elected officials, all in the name of the DREAM Act’s passage. But BEWARE. Be very careful. Because our honorable youth with their dreams and wishes to serve their new country are being tricked and manipulated in an immoral and criminal way.

Why do I say this? Simply put, the DREAM Act proposes two years of college as a pathway to permanent residency but it also includes a second option linked to the so-called war on terror-“two years of military service.” Our young people may not see that this is a covert draft in which thousands of youth from Latino families will be sent to Iraq or some other war torn nation where they will have to surrender their moral values and become a war criminal or perhaps return home in black bags on their way to a tomb drenched with their parents’ tears.

However, an anonomous, undocumented youth, who stands to benifit from the proposed DREAM Act, responded:

As a potential beneficiary of the DREAM Act, I as well as most other undocumented students such as myself disagree with the opinion of this letter. Yes, the DREAM Act does offer us a light at the end a dark and uncertain road. But please do not presume to know or define what that light is for us. We are not ignorant of the fact that yes we are potential targets for military recruiters.

Yes, undocumented students who are beneficiaries of the DREAM Act might just be hopeless and shortsighted and willing to do anything to find a way out of our immigration situation. . . . What we see as an opportunity, immigration rights organizations might see as a fault, a problem, an unthinkable. Well, please take a second and see things through our prespective, isn’t it our rights and our needs that these immigration organizations exist for?

Instead of opposing the DREAM Act, I speak for thousands of DREAM Act beneficiaries that please support this legislation with the military provision included. It might not be the perfect legislation to immigration rights organizations but let us make the decision to accept or reject the choices before us, we just want a choice. . . .

These are difficult choices, but as I previously wrote, I feel in the end it is the students and youth affected that should be listened to. What do you think?

4 thoughts on “DREAM Act part II

  1. Thank you for the additional links and information Dreamie! I think you raise important points about who are community and advocacy organizations accountable to. How does the decision making process occur? Where are compromises needed to ensure the possibility of change, and how are those compromises decided upon?

  2. Thank you for the additional links and information Dreamie! I think you raise important points about who are community and advocacy organizations accountable to. How does the decision making process occur? Where are compromises needed to ensure the possibility of change, and how are those compromises decided upon?

  3. As an undocumented immigrant student, I sometimes feel handicapped. When I was thirteen, I left my country and came to America to live with my father. I didn’t know English. My parents were divorced and I helped take of my younger siblings. But most difficult of all is the fact that I did not have any papers. Because of this, I don’t have the same chance to get a higher education. However, I have learned to embrace this situation because it makes me strong. I have begun to think that difficulties make me a better person, able to overcome anything in the way of my success. They make me creative, determined, and more motivated to find solutions for students like me.
    Every day, I think about what will happen in my future. I study so hard to get better grades. I am involved in school activities and the other Community Centers in Stamford. But it is not enough. Sometimes I can’t sleep because my mind is working so hard trying to figure out how to make my dreams reality. I want to go to college because it is my only chance to build my future so that I can to help my community by making projects to improve our society.
    I can see the light at the end of my road. I am pretty sure that our community would improve if we worked together to accomplish our goals. That is why I started to get people together to support the federal DREAM Act. It will give non-documented students the opportunity to get permanent residency and to have access to financial aid. This will enable them to attain a higher education. That is my goal.
    To accomplish my goal, I started to form a network with diverse clubs at Greenwich High School. I also spoke to neighboring schools in Port Chester and Stamford. In addition, I have contacted many public officials such as Congressman Felipe Reinoso, Stamford’s Mayor Dan Malloy, and even President Bush.
    I have persuaded people to join my cause by appealing not only to their minds, but also to their hearts. I approached them with sentiment and resolution in order to captivate their intellect and motivation. I told them about friends of mine like Julie, a brilliant student who does not have the money to pay for college nor the papers to apply for scholarships. I explained how they could help and the positive results their actions would bring to the community. The word is spreading. The Spanish Club (Vision) is having meetings with the Parent-Teacher Association in order to get support for the Dream Act. We are coordinating with the Spanish Honor Society and making them aware of our fellow students’ dilemma.
    When I came to this amazing country, it wasn’t my decision to come undocumented. Nevertheless, I grew up in the United States of America. I feel that this is my country and I love it. I just want an opportunity to succeed. Throughout this experience, I have learned that motivation is not enough. I have come to understand that planning, coordination, and preparation is essential when addressing different groups of people simultaneously. I know that during this process many doors will be closed. However, when I find a closed door, I will find two more open!

  4. As an undocumented immigrant student, I sometimes feel handicapped. When I was thirteen, I left my country and came to America to live with my father. I didn’t know English. My parents were divorced and I helped take of my younger siblings. But most difficult of all is the fact that I did not have any papers. Because of this, I don’t have the same chance to get a higher education. However, I have learned to embrace this situation because it makes me strong. I have begun to think that difficulties make me a better person, able to overcome anything in the way of my success. They make me creative, determined, and more motivated to find solutions for students like me.
    Every day, I think about what will happen in my future. I study so hard to get better grades. I am involved in school activities and the other Community Centers in Stamford. But it is not enough. Sometimes I can’t sleep because my mind is working so hard trying to figure out how to make my dreams reality. I want to go to college because it is my only chance to build my future so that I can to help my community by making projects to improve our society.
    I can see the light at the end of my road. I am pretty sure that our community would improve if we worked together to accomplish our goals. That is why I started to get people together to support the federal DREAM Act. It will give non-documented students the opportunity to get permanent residency and to have access to financial aid. This will enable them to attain a higher education. That is my goal.
    To accomplish my goal, I started to form a network with diverse clubs at Greenwich High School. I also spoke to neighboring schools in Port Chester and Stamford. In addition, I have contacted many public officials such as Congressman Felipe Reinoso, Stamford’s Mayor Dan Malloy, and even President Bush.
    I have persuaded people to join my cause by appealing not only to their minds, but also to their hearts. I approached them with sentiment and resolution in order to captivate their intellect and motivation. I told them about friends of mine like Julie, a brilliant student who does not have the money to pay for college nor the papers to apply for scholarships. I explained how they could help and the positive results their actions would bring to the community. The word is spreading. The Spanish Club (Vision) is having meetings with the Parent-Teacher Association in order to get support for the Dream Act. We are coordinating with the Spanish Honor Society and making them aware of our fellow students’ dilemma.
    When I came to this amazing country, it wasn’t my decision to come undocumented. Nevertheless, I grew up in the United States of America. I feel that this is my country and I love it. I just want an opportunity to succeed. Throughout this experience, I have learned that motivation is not enough. I have come to understand that planning, coordination, and preparation is essential when addressing different groups of people simultaneously. I know that during this process many doors will be closed. However, when I find a closed door, I will find two more open!

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