Category Archives: journalism

Editorial cartoon on Judge Sotomayor has subtext of lynching, stereotypes Latinos

The Oklahoman newspaper printed on Tuesday a racist, sexist and outright offensive “editorial” cartoon. It depicts Judge Sotomayor strung up by a rope, likening itself to lynching images or a piñata, with President Barack Obama wearing a sombrero, holding a stick and asking a crowd of elephants (Republicans) “Now, who wants to be first?” The […]
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NABJ Statement on Future of Journalism Senate Hearing

Barbara Ciara, president of the National Association of Black Journalists, today issued this statement: On Wednesday, a panel of digital and traditional journalism industry experts testified at a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation Subcommittee on Communications, Technology and Internet Hearing on “The Future of Journalism” about the challenges and successes facing online news […]
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NABJ Statement on Future of Journalism Senate Hearing

Barbara Ciara, president of the National Association of Black Journalists, today issued this statement: On Wednesday, a panel of digital and traditional journalism industry experts testified at a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation Subcommittee on Communications, Technology and Internet Hearing on “The Future of Journalism” about the challenges and successes facing online news […]
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NY Post Editorial Cartoon: Simian Stereotypes and Cartoonist Excuses

If nothing else, the now-infamous New York Post cartoon by Sean Delonas published Wednesday showing a chimp shot to death by police officers should be a clear answer to the question of whether we’re in a “post-racial” America. As EJS President Eva Paterson and others have argued, the answer to that question is a resounding […]
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Eva Paterson: ABC7 Story on Ledbetter Act

Eva Paterson is included in a story by ABC7’s Mark Matthews on President Obama’s signing of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, which will make it easier for people to get the pay they deserve — regardless of their gender, race, or age. The Act was introduced by Bay Area Congressman George Miller.